Home > Art, Churches, Doors, Italy, Saints, Torino > Walks in the city centre of Torino 2

Walks in the city centre of Torino 2

San Dalmazzo Torino © Vincenzo Aiosa

San Dalmazzo Torino © Vincenzo Aiosa

San Dalmazzo Torino © Vincenzo Aiosa

Church of San Dalmazzo

The church of San Dalmazzo, placed in the heart of the city in via delle Orfane, is one of the oldest of Turin.Ever since the year 1000 we have got evidence of a pre-existent religious building of basilical plan consecrated to San Dalmazzo martyr, placed on the actual via Garibaldi.Church of San DalmazzoFrom 1271, the church was committed to the Ospitalieri di Sant’Antonio friars, and in 1606 to the Barnabiti (religious order funded in Milan in 1530 by Sant’Antonio Maria Zaccaria), who will see in 1702 to the construction of the façade, to the enlargement of the inside, to the construction of the chapel of the Madonna di Loreto (between 1629 and 1631), to imitate the house of the Virgin existent in Loreto.The church is a building of basilical structure with a nave and two side aisles; in the sides of the side aisles there are eight niches with altars.The nave is characterized by the presence, on its high part, of encaustic figures, a work of art by the painter Enrico Reffo depicting widows, penitents, virgins and martyrs.The pulpit made of Carrara marble is of a remarkable value and it has the effigy of the priest Filippo Montuoro, in order to remember the great work of the building renewing.The altar is surmounted by a marble canopy supported by four pillars.In the right side aisle there is the San Paolo’s chapel, strictly linked to the presence of the Barnabiti in the church.In the chapel a large window surmounts the altar made of incised marble; in it there are portrayed, beside San Paolo, San Carlo Borromeo (which was the first to show his trust in the works of Sant’Antonio Maria Zaccaria), and San Francesco di Sales (in its charisma, the order strongly recognizes itself).The fourth is consecrated to San Leonardo Murialdo, an essential help to young workers in the Turin of the second half of the 19th century, which sees growing rapidly its

Categories: Art, Churches, Doors, Italy, Saints, Torino
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